Wednesday, 4 February 2015

GCB-95 Crybaby Wah MODS

Another big one! Here is the famous crybaby GCB-95 wah pedal. A lot of people have this one, therefore, even more people are looking to mod this thing until the cows come home. A simple google search delivers a wide array of mods that is enough to boggle the mind of anybody trying to choose which ones to do. 

I'm not doing anything revolutionary here but I did some common mods that, in my opinion, sound great! The general theme behind all of these mods is that they push the circuit harder and drive the transistors to work harder than they should. Some resistor values are lowered to increase the gain going into the transistor, effectively increasing the gain of the circuit. This however gives a great sounding wah sound!

Here are some pics of the changes I did to the board:

There's a nice little picture of the PCB. There are some variations between the different years. I believe this is one of the most recent GCB-95's. 

R5: Changing this will change the Q of the effect. The Q is the width of the bandpass filter. Lower resistance, more subtle wah sound. Higher resistance will give you a sharper more vocal wah.  
Stock: 33k
Mods: -47k
           -68k  -  (This is the one I choose) 
           -100k


R1: Increasing this will smooth out the transition between heel to toe. Sometimes the stock wah can transition quite rapidly and doesn't sound too good. This should smooth out that transition and increase the mids.  
Stock: 1.5k
Mods: -1.8k
           -2.2k  -  (This is the one I choose)
           -2.7k

R9: This resistor change will increase the gain of that transistor and add more bass response.
Stock: 390ohm
Mods: -270ohm
           -300ohm
           -330ohm - (The one I choose)
            

R15: This is the input resistor. Therefore, if you decrease it, more signal will pass through the circuit and as a result, it will give it a little volume boost
Stock: 68k - (I stuck with this value because I found it had no huge difference with the 47k)
Mods: 47k
       


List of mods done on my wah:

  • Resistor       Stock        Mod
  • R5               33k           68k
  • R1               1.5k          2.2k
  • R9               390ohm    330ohm
  • R15             68k           68k


Everybody has their own preference of wah pedal. I like the way mine turned out, but I encourage you try different values and find out what works well with your rig. In general, all of these mods increased the gain going into the transistors. You can definitely hear the difference, my wah sounds more vocal, louder, and more gainier.

Happy modding!

Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Been a long time

1 year and 2 months,
or  28 fortnights if your into that kind of stuff.
That is how long it has been since I've last posted on this blog. 

I'm not too sure why I stopped posting. To be fair, it has been a pretty long and strenuous school year. But I'm sure most of you care not for it. In this new year I want to start this back up again. but with a little twist...

As much as I enjoy building guitar pedals, and will continue to do so, my focus has shifted onto another realm of audio...recording. In the time since I've last posted, I obtained the materials needed for a nice little analog home studio. I've translated some of the stuff I've learned from building guitar pedals to this other side of audio electronics. I still want to keep this blog alive but I think the name might not be fitting for the new stuff I want to post.

I really just wanted to give the frequent viewers of the site a little update. I'll be definitely posting some very exciting stuff, very soon. Stay tuned!

Analog on,
Dimitri

Saturday, 28 December 2013

OffBoard soldering the BOX oF ROCK!

I finally finished it! I built the ZVex Box of Rock and it sounds amazing! This post is to show you all the off board soldering I did in this pedal. I'm pretty pleased with the way it turned out, the wires are fairly neat. Well...here it is

 I always start with soldering the LED first
Then the power and ground. For me it is always a chalenge to fit two wires in the small lugs of the power jack. What I like to do is twist them as small as I can then put them both in at the same time.
I feel like I could have done a better job soldering the 3PDT switch but it works just fine.
Here I have the small board for the LED. This board holds the resistor for the LED. I made it as small as possible so it would fit anywhere.
And since a lot of the ground is connected to the jacks, I do that next. As you can see I usually always have the ground connections with black wire just for a visual representation.

 It's always really hard to fit both wires into the small hole but I did it. Since the second red wire goes to the LED. Next time I'll just solder another wire to the board where the 9v is coming in











Hope this help a little bit!

Sunday, 22 December 2013

Spray Painting metal enclosures (Hammer Tone)

So you can solder up a perf board with resistors and capacitors and make your pedal sound amazing. But whats the next step.... pedal finishes! This is exactly how I feel. I've built about 5 or 6 pedals and I'm really getting around to doing a good job of it. But when I go on these DIY guitar pedal forums, I see these professionals that have amazing graphics on their pedals. If you spend time on these forums you'll notice a lot of talk about "Powder coating", this is the preferred method by boutique builders and big companies. There are thousands of articles about powder coating on the internet, but I could never find a good article about spray painting pedals. In my mind, spray painting was the easiest way to achieve a nice finish and at the end of this page you might see that it does a decent job of doing so. Before you start spray painting make sure you finish all your drilling because it you drill after you paint, you might damage the finish.

Here is how I spray painted my metal enclosure with spray paint:

1. Buy the spray paint you want
Usually when you build a pedal, you have an idea what the graphics or finishes might look like. There are thousands of different kinds of spray paints, I just went to my local hardware store. I didn't really want to just have a solide colour. Instead I I got this really cool HAMMERED paint by Rustoleum. 

I got it in a Rosemary colour because it had the most detail. If you look really closely to the picture below, you can see that it's got a really neat looking texture to it. Now I warn you, if you want to use this paint, or and other hammer tone paint, it's a lot more difficult to apply and get the results you want, I'll explain more on the tips of spray painting with specifically this kind of spray paint.  

2. Find a space that is well ventilated 
I'm sure we all hate the smell of spray paint so if you can, SAVE YOUR SELF AND SPRAY PAINT OUTSIDE! Sadly I could not spray paint outside because the paint can says that it needs a temperature of 10°C so I needed to spray paint in my workshop because it's wintertime in Canada! If you do paint inside, at least find a window you can open.   


3. Prep the enclosure for painting
This step is very important because you need to roughen up the enclosure so that the paint can stick onto it. This step is very simple, you just need 3 things, low grit sand paper, higher but not super fine grit sand paper, and a wire brush. I you want you really only need sandpaper but the wire brush helps. If you are going to use all of the go from left to right in terms of order, heavy sandpaper to start and wire brush to finish. Make sure to do one side at a time. When you are done this step,  go to your sink and wet the enclosure. Use soap and lather it everywhere you roughened up. This will help get rid of al the really small metal particles stuck in the grooves. If you don't do this step, the paint will have a hard time sticking on. 

4. PAINT
I strongly suggest that you start with the back plate of the enclosure. This will be your kinda practice run because it's only the back, you won't see it often. I'm sure we all know how to spray paint, point and shoot. Always read the label of the can, it might have some helpful tips for the paint. Generally you want to start with a light base coat. A couple sprays back and forth will do it. On these sprays, don't go slow, go at a moderate passe. Then, just leave it over night. The next day once it is dry, go for the second coat. This time you have a choice for it to be the final coat or just another one. I suggest that you go for another light coat and let it dry overnight. Now for the final coat. For this particular paint specifically, go slow when you are moving across. This hammer tone paint is weird, very unpredictable. So go slow when applying the final coat, don't be afraid if it's thick, it'll just take time to dry. With this paint I noticed that I wasn't happy with the look of it on the third coat, so I just sprayed more on it. I maybe sprayed 5 coats on it before I was happy with the result.


If you look really hard you can see the really cool texture of this paint


Now that you have the back plate done, it is time to paint the full enclosure. I used a piece of wood to hold it up. With this paint you really want to spray downwards. If it is not sprayed down, the texture won't be the same. So as you can see with these pictures I've made it so the enclosure is almost flat.





I did the face of the enclosure last because it was the spot that I would see the most and I would of had the most practice.

I pretty pleased with the sides of the enclosure


The drying process. As I said, spray paint on a flat surface so you spray downwards. once you are done that coat, let it sit for about 30mins to an hour. At this point it will still be tacky but the texture will be solidified. to accelerate the drying you can use a fan like in the picture below.


If something looks dry, it isn't always completely dry so be carful. I made this mistake and left a noticeable fingerprint, don't make these sad mistakes


In the cardboard box that I spray painted in, to the side of my wood block, the extra paint dried and make the coolest thing ever. I really wish that my whole pedal could have turned out this way


Because I wasn't happy with the finish of the face of my enclosure, I decided to do another coat. This time I think I got something amazing!


Just look at that texture!


Last thing, because you now have a frickn' sweet looking pedal, you don't want to damage the finish. So when you do your offboard soldering, make sure to have some kind of cloth under you pedal. This will make sure your finish is nice and clean. 


Hope you benefited from this post and may your metal enclosure finished be sweet!

Tuesday, 3 December 2013

10,000 PAGE VIEWS!!!!!!!!!!

WOW! thats all I have to say. I started this blog a couple months ago and I never thought that it would catch on. I guess all I can say is THANK YOU!
If any of you have any requests for me to do something like instructional videos or sound clips, anything really, I'd be glad to do it! I'm really interested to hear what some followers of my blog have to say and add.
Once again thank you all and leave some comments down below!

Monday, 2 December 2013

ZVex Box of ROCK pot soldering

I got around to soldering the pots onto the board. In some other posts  used this really cool technique where I use cardboard as a base and attach the pots to there. This allows me to get in every little crevasse of the soldering process and make a nice and tight wiring job. Here are some pictures!


So here you can really see how I was able to get all the wires attached to the pots with minimal slack

This black wire running from the gain pot attaches to the volume pot...
...There is no slack, very tight and fitted in the space





Before you try this cardboard method I suggest you drill the holes for the enclosure to get all the spacing correct. Because I was really anxious to start soldering I just drilled the pot holes.
For this project I want to venture into enclosure finishes!
I chose this really cool spray paint that gives a hammer tone finish. I think this just looks so cool on a pedal. I'll have to finish drilling all the holes before I can get started painting. I'll post my process of painting in. It should be very interesting and a great learning experience!
I hopefully can get some work done this weekend. I'd at least try and get the base coat of this paint going.